There are some serious concerns businesses and part-time workers should have when considering Measure E this November. Labor‚Äôs ordinance creates burdensome regulation for business by exposing employers to lawsuits, the loss of a flexible workforce, rigid scheduling practices, and little room for making amendments, which spells disaster for both business and the economy. This negative impact on business is reinforced with the public opposition of both San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo and the Mercury News.

If approved, Measure E will affect 1,200 businesses in Silicon Valley by mandating employers with more than 35 workers offer extra hours to current employees before hiring on extra personnel. In theory, this sounds great, however it would require rigid record-keeping burdens for employers to try and defend themselves against unclear lawsuits demanding verification each time hours are made available. This Measure is yet another potential deterrent for would-be businesses thinking about establishing themselves in San Jose.

Proponents of Measure E paint business as ‚Äúunscrupulous‚Äù barons who callously exploit their workforce by denying them full-time benefits. Rather the business community understands a key pillar of the economy is a flexible workforce. Measure E doesn‚Äôt create jobs as Ben Field of the South Bay Labor council himself puts it, rather it limits the number of available hours that part time job seekers have access to. Studies show that for every high tech sector job created there are approximately 4.3 jobs in service sectors produced. Making Silicon Valley an attractive place for companies to come do business creates jobs and translates into more hours available and more people employed.

We should be adding employment hours not creating additional burdensome regulation.

Particularly concerning for small businesses is the lack of an exemption for employers who rely on seasonal workers; potentially producing a nightmare for employers who would be forced to offer full-time benefits to a rapidly changing workforce. The final nail in the coffin comes from the complete lack of consultation sought by Labor from the business community. Labor totes the ‚Äòflexibility‚Äô of the ordinance to allow for business input at the city council, but, according to this Mercury News article the city attorney office ‚Äúfinds little latitude except in setting penalties.‚Äù

Measure E could have been improved with more consensus building, but now there is a deeply flawed albeit well intentioned ordinance facing voters.

More Posts

You Might Also Like

In The Media
In the News: San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo on Nashville
Mayor Sam Liccardo on his experience in Nashville on the #svostudymission.
Sep 11, 2019
The Silicon Valley Organization
Members In The News
Blach Construction’s Kim Scott Honored Among Silicon Valley Business Journal’s 2019 “40 Under 40” Award Winners
Blach Construction, a full-service and award-winning commercial builder serving the Greater Bay Area and Monterey since 1970, congratulates Vice President, Business Development and Marketing Kim Scott on her recognition as a 2019 Silicon Valley Business Journal “40 Under 40” honoree. Scott accepted the award at a reception at San Jose’s Club Auto Sport on July 25 alongside 39 other outstanding young professional and community leaders.
Aug 5, 2019
The Silicon Valley Organization
SVO Foundation
2019 Leadership San Jose: Debra Dake-Morrell
Deb Dake-Morrell is a Supervising Program Administrator for Valley Water, where she leads the best team ever! Deb and her team work with the community to resolve violations of the Ordinance that protects the creeks and waterways of Santa Clara County. A highly sensitive issue, she brings her background in conflict resolution and human relations to the job on a daily basis. Deb’s favorite part of the work she does is the people and the reward of doing her part to return creek-side land to its natural habitat.
Aug 5, 2019
The Silicon Valley Organization
Members In The News
Not Another "AI is here" blog post
Artificial intelligence (AI) is often associated with futuristic visions of a world where robots and humans live together in peace—or not, depending on the scenario. Meanwhile, as the future unfolds, AI has become a ubiquitous and somewhat annoying buzzword that risks losing its meaning. So, what is AI anyway and why does your business need to know about it?
Jul 30, 2019
The Silicon Valley Organization
Public Policy & Advocacy
CALL TO ACTION - Housing at San Jose City Council Meeting 8/6/19
Jul 1, 2019
The Silicon Valley Organization
SVO Foundation
2019 Leadership San Jose: Michael Lin
Jun 26, 2019
The Silicon Valley Organization
Explore ALl Posts
Follow Us

We’re on Instagram