Federal Legislation: H.R. 1468 – Recognizing America’s Children Act

Federal Legislation: H.R. 1468 – Recognizing America’s Children Act

Recognizing America’s Children Act would permit young undocumented immigrants, often referred to as Dreamers, who were brought to the U.S. as children and have lived here since at least January 1, 2012, to gain a five-year “conditional permanent resident” status if they pursue vocational or higher education, enlist in the military or are gainfully employed, and meet other requirements.

The RAC Act is a Republican-led bill that could provide more than 750,000 young immigrants participating in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), as well as other eligible young undocumented immigrants brought to America as children, the opportunity to earn a legal status.

The bill would create a five-year “conditional permanent resident” status for young undocumented immigrants that would protect them from deportation, allow them to work legally in the United States and permit them to travel outside the country. To qualify for “conditional permanent resident” status, young undocumented immigrants would need to meet the following requirements:

  • Establish that they came to the U.S. before the age of 16 and have continuously lived in the U.S. since at least January 1, 2012;
  • Meet one of the following requirements (if they are 18 years or older):
  1. Demonstrate an intent to join the U.S. military (military path);
  2. Be admitted to an institution of higher education (higher education path);
  3. Have a valid work authorization document (worker path).

If these requirements are met “Conditional permanent resident” status can be extended once for a second period of five years by meeting one of the following requirements:

  • Have graduated from an institution of higher education (higher education path); or
  • Have been employed for a total period of at least 48 months during the preceding five-year period (worker path).
  • Have been enlisted in the military or an active-duty reserve component of the military for at least three years during the preceding five-year period (military path).

As soon as the “conditional permanent resident” status is extended, recipients could apply to become a lawful permanent resident (green-card holder) if they continue to meet the requirements set in the bill. Recipients enlisted in the military could apply for naturalization immediately after obtaining lawful permanent resident status.

Under the bill, a recipient’s “conditional permanent resident status” would be revoked if he or she failed to continue to meet all of the bill’s requirements.

POSITION: SUPPORT

STATUS: Referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence. 

LINK: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1468

Questions? Please contact Victor Cuauhtémoc Gomez, Sr. Director of Public Policy at victorg@thesvo.com

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